Key changes to the labour laws in 2015 – part 4: ARBITRATIONS IN LIEU OF DISCIPLINARY HEARINGS

The Labour Relations Act has long provided for the possibility of what was called (to the dread of many an employee) a “pre-dismissal hearing”. This had the effect of a CCMA arbitration, but replaced an in-house disciplinary process by the employer. In the latter, an employer would make allegations about an employee’s conduct or capacity which could result in the employee’s dismissal, and hold a hearing and, possibly, an appeal – and perhaps then end up defending the process at the CCMA at an arbitration preceded by a conciliation. In the former, the CCMA would take over the process, enquire into the allegations, and make a decision having the effect of an arbitration award – a greatly streamlined process.

In the past this could only be done by the employer with the consent of the employee.

The new law enables industry- or workplace-wide collective agreements to provide for inquiries by arbitrators (formerly “pre-dismissal arbitrations”), instead of requiring consent by individual employees in each case.

In addition, under the new law this process may be triggered by either the employee or the employer, when an employee complains that the holding of a hearing into her conduct or incapacity contravenes the Protected Disclosures Act. That Act aims to protect whistleblowers in the workplace. This new provision is directed at maximising fairness, while minimising the protracted litigation arising in disputes under the Protected Disclosures Act.