Key changes to the labour laws in 2015 – part 1: EASIER ENFORCEMENT OF CCMA AWARDS

The long-awaited Labour Relations Amendment Act came into effect, in large part, on 1 January 2015. It brought about a number of changes in both individual and collective labour law. In this series, we consider the key changes affecting individual labour law, and of which employees and employers alike should take note.

Prior to 2002, an employee who succeeded at the CCMA but whose employer ignored the CCMA’s award, had a steep hill to climb to get satisfaction. The employee would need to approach the Labour Court and have the award made an order of court, before having a writ of execution issued and handed to the sheriff of the court. This involved a full application to court supported by an affidavit, to be served under the rules of court, and awaiting and responding to any notice of opposition and answering affidavit from the employer. The employee would need to appear before a judge to secure an order against the employer. It was a complex and intimidating process for a layperson, time-consuming, and could increase costs drastically.

In 2002, the law was changed in order to assist employees in enforcing awards. Instead of approaching the Labour Court with a full application on notice and on affidavit, the employee returned to the CCMA to have the award certified. Once the award was certified, the employee went to the Labour Court to have a writ of execution against the employer issued over the counter. This was handed to the sheriff of the court for enforcement. This was a much simpler, cheaper, quicker process. However many employees still found the process, in particular dealing with two institutions, confusing and frustrating.

As of 2015, the process for enforcement is even more streamlined. Our law now states that an arbitration award may be enforced as if it were an order of the Labour Court in respect of which a writ has been issued. An employee battling with a recalcitrant employer must still have the award certified at the CCMA as previously, but then can take her certified award directly to the sheriff of the court for execution. There is no longer any need to involve the Labour Court, provided the award requires the employer to pay over money (as opposed to doing something – such as taking the employee back into employment. Where the award requires the employer to do something, other than pay over money, contempt proceedings in the Labour Court remain appropriate.)

The new law only applies prospectively, to arbitration awards issued after 1 January 2015.

The tariffs and procedures for enforcement and execution will be those that apply in the magistrates courts, which seems appropriate given that in almost all cases the amounts of money involved in awards will fall within the monetary jurisdiction of the magistrates courts (R300 000,00 or less).