Key changes to the labour laws in 2015 – part 3: ARBITRATION, THE LABOUR COURT AND REVIEW

PRIVATE ARBITRATION

Where an employer and employee have made no other agreement about resolution of disputes between them, their disputes are generally conciliated and, if not required to go to the Labour Court, arbitrated by the CCMA or a bargaining council, in terms of the Labour Relations Act, in what is known as “compulsory arbitration”. However some employers and employees agree up-front in employment contracts to bypass the system of compulsory arbitration, and rather have disputes resolved by way of private arbitration. Private arbitration services are provided by private companies, as opposed to compulsory arbitration which is provided by the CCMA, set up by statute, or bargaining councils, set up by industry-wide agreements.

In the past, if the CCMA accepted a dispute referral but then realised that the parties had agreed to private arbitration, the CCMA would generally decline to hear the matter, and insist that it be referred instead to the relevant private arbitrator as per the parties’ agreement.

The legislature identified abuse of the scope for private arbitration, however, and has amended the Labour Relations Act this year to require the CCMA to hear disputes, even where they ordinarily would not have the power to do so owing to a private arbitration clause in an agreement. This amendment applies (1) when an employee who earns less than R205 000* per year (*subject to change)  is required by the agreement to pay any part of the costs of the private arbitration, and (2) when the private arbitrator nominated in the agreement is not independent of the employer.

THE LABOUR COURT AND ARBITRATION

Where the Labour Court receives a referral of a dispute which ought to have been referred to arbitration, the court may either refer the dispute to arbitration or continue with the proceedings and make only an order which an arbitrator would have been empowered to make. In the past, the Labour Court could only continue with the proceedings with the consent of all the parties. As of 2015, the parties’ consent is no longer necessary, and instead the court can determine that it is expedient to continue and do so regardless of any objection by either party.

MORE RESTRICTIONS ON REVIEW APPLICATIONS

While the majority of review applications are no doubt brought in good faith, as mentioned in a previous post, they have also been much abused as delaying tactics and for employers in particular to evade compliance with awards despite there being no real prospect of overturning the awards. Some review applications have languished in court files for years, and employees have lacked the knowledge or means to force matters along effectively.

In a further attempt to tighten the reins on abuse of review applications, and resultant unnecessary delays and cost increases in proceedings, the legislature has determined that, as of 2015, no review may be brought of any decision or ruling made during conciliation or arbitration until the issue in dispute has been finally determined. The exception shall be when the court is of the view that it is just and equitable to hear the review at an earlier stage. This will prevent many a party from abandoning arbitration hearings on the first day, and holding the process hostage by filing reviews of minor determinations made by an arbitrator before even hearing evidence on the main issue.

One thought on “Key changes to the labour laws in 2015 – part 3: ARBITRATION, THE LABOUR COURT AND REVIEW

  1. This is so really good information about arbitration. It is good to know that it would be smart to know that this is handled in labour court. That is a good thing to know if you would want to go to court.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s